Leopard Hunting

leopard RZ

Leopard can be hunted on a minimum of a 14day Safari (21days is better) or it can be added to your Big Game Safari for a trophy fee

The Leopard is the smallest member of the big 5, but probably the most feared by Professional Hunters. Do not underestimate this cat, he is lightning fast and very acrobatic, armed with razor sharp claws and hefty canines this cat is equipped to cause serous damage, if not death. It is said that a Leopards speed is determined by the amount of stitches per second, it can be as much as a 100 stitches for every second the cat is on you, whilst receiving up to 1000 stitches after been attacked by a Leopard is not uncommon.

They can be hunted with calibers as little as the .270 caliber but in most countries the legal minimum is a .375 caliber. Use the largest caliber you can shoot comfortably and accurately with quality soft-nose bullets. The average shooting distance will be between 30 to 70 yards.

These secretive cats have very good eyesight and hearing and a keen sense of smell, they are mainly hunted from a blind over bait. This is by far the most difficult member to hunt of all the Big 5. The challenge lies in the preparation of the bait and to remain undetected. The smallest irregularity will cause the cat to abandon the bait.

Leopard hunting can be best described as hours and hours of utter boredom topped with 10 seconds of cheer terror. Make absolutely sure about your first shot, following a wounded Leopard is not for the faint hearted, these cats come at great speed, they are difficult to hit since they don’t come straight like a lion, they would typically wait in ambush and charge from a short distance, they are masters of camouflage and can hide behind one straw of grass. Most survivors from leopard attacks said they never saw the cat until it was too late.

Leopard Information

The Leopard can weigh as mush as 200lbs and stand up to 31iches tall at the shoulder. Leopards are known for their ability in climbing, and have been observed resting on tree branches during the day, dragging their kills up trees and hanging them there, and descending from trees headfirst. They are very agile, and can run at over 58 kilometers per hour (36 mph), leap over 6 meters (20 ft) horizontally, and jump up to 3 meters (9.8 ft) vertically. They produce a number of vocalizations, including grunts, roars, growls, meows, and "sawing" sounds.

Home ranges of male leopards vary between 30 km2 (12 sq mi) and 78 km2 (30 sq mi), and of females between 15 to 16 km2 (5.8 to 6.2 sq mi).  Virtually all sources suggest that males do have larger home ranges. There seems to be little or no overlap in territory among males, although overlap exists between the sexes.

Leopards are versatile, opportunistic hunters, and have a very broad diet. They feed on a greater diversity of prey than other members of the Panthera species, and will eat anything from dung beetles to 900 kg (2,000 lb) Elands, though prey usually weighs considerably less than 200 kg (440 lbs). Their diet consists mostly of ungulates, followed by primates, primarily monkeys of various species, including the Vervet monkey and Baboons. However, they will also opportunistically eat rodents, reptiles, amphibians, insects, birds (especially ground-based types like Guineafowl), fish and sometimes smaller predators (such as jackals and smaller felid species). In at least one instance, a leopard has predated a sub-adult Nile crocodile that was crossing over land. They stalk their prey silently, pounce on it at the last minute, and strangle its throat with a quick bite. In Africa, mid-sized antelopes provide a majority of their prey, especially impala and Thomson's gazelle.

Leopard Hunting

 

The Leopard is the smallest member of the big 5, but probably the most feared by Professional Hunters. Do not underestimate this cat, he is lightning fast and very acrobatic, armed with razor sharp claws and hefty canines this cat is equipped to cause serous damage, if not death. It is said that a Leopards speed is determined by the amount of stitches per second, it can be as much as a 100 stitches for every second the cat is on you, whilst receiving up to 1000 stitches after been attacked by a Leopard is not uncommon.

 

They can be hunted with calibers as little as the .270 caliber but in most countries the legal minimum is a .375 caliber. Use the largest caliber you can shoot comfortably and accurately with quality soft-nose bullets. The average shooting distance will be between 30 to 70 yards.

 

These secretive cats have very good eyesight and hearing and a keen sense of smell, they are mainly hunted from a blind over bait. This is by far the most difficult member to hunt of all the Big 5. The challenge lies in the preparation of the bait and to remain undetected. The smallest irregularity will cause the cat to abandon the bait.

 

Leopard hunting can be best described as hours and hours of utter boredom topped with 10 seconds of cheer terror. Make absolutely sure about your first shot, following a wounded Leopard is not for the faint hearted, these cats come at great speed, they are difficult to hit since they don’t come straight like a lion, they would typically wait in ambush and charge from a short distance, they are masters of camouflage and can hide behind one straw of grass. Most survivors from leopard attacks said they never saw the cat until it was too late.

 

Leopard Information

 

The Leopard can weigh as mush as 200lbs and stand up to 31iches tall at the shoulder. Leopards are known for their ability in climbing, and have been observed resting on tree branches during the day, dragging their kills up trees and hanging them there, and descending from trees headfirst. They are very agile, and can run at over 58 kilometers per hour (36 mph), leap over 6 meters (20 ft) horizontally, and jump up to 3 meters (9.8 ft) vertically. They produce a number of vocalizations, including grunts, roars, growls, meows, and "sawing" sounds.

 

Home ranges of male leopards vary between 30 km2 (12 sq mi) and 78 km2 (30 sq mi), and of females between 15 to 16 km2 (5.8 to 6.2 sq mi).  Virtually all sources suggest that males do have larger home ranges. There seems to be little or no overlap in territory among males, although overlap exists between the sexes.

 

Leopards are versatile, opportunistic hunters, and have a very broad diet. They feed on a greater diversity of prey than other members of the Panthera species, and will eat anything from dung beetles to 900 kg (2,000 lb) Elands, though prey usually weighs considerably less than 200 kg (440 lbs). Their diet consists mostly of ungulates, followed by primates, primarily monkeys of various species, including the Vervet monkey and Baboons. However, they will also opportunistically eat rodents, reptiles, amphibians, insects, birds (especially ground-based types like Guineafowl), fish and sometimes smaller predators (such as jackals and smaller felid species). In at least one instance, a leopard has predated a sub-adult Nile crocodile that was crossing over land. They stalk their prey silently, pounce on it at the last minute, and strangle its throat with a quick bite. In Africa, mid-sized antelopes provide a majority of their prey, especially impala and Thomson's gazelle.

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